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Speculum Play

Definition - What does Speculum Play mean?

Speculum play is any sexual interactions involving the use of the medical devices called speculums. During speculum play, a dominant partner typically takes on the role of a doctor while a submissive person plays the patient.

Speculum play can involve internal examinations of the vagina or anus. Speculum play may be used to add variety to the sex life, especially among BDSM couples. It may be a component of a medical-themed BDSM scene or a key part of the way someone with a medical fetish enjoys sex.

Kinkly explains Speculum Play

Being stretched out with a speculum can heighten a submissive’s senses and open them up to sensations not available through other forms of play. Speculum play also allows a dominant to see parts of a submissive that they could not usually see. This can be very erotic for the dominant.

Stainless steel speculums are intended for multiple use, while Perspex speculums should be discarded after use. Disposable speculums are ideal for multiple-partner speculum play. There are also specially designed speculums for anal use. These are the only ones you should use for rear-entry play.

Since speculums are made from metal or hard plastic, they can be uncomfortable to insert and could even cause tearing. Start small and go slow. Use a silicone- or water-based lubricant to make insertion easier. You may also like to insert a finger first to warm up the area.

People experimenting with speculums should take similar precautions to doctors to ensure safe, hygienic play. Dominants should wash their hands, wear surgical gloves, and wipe down the speculum with an alcohol swab to sanitize it before insertion. While making speculum play hygienic, it also makes the play feel more realistic. You can also sanitize stainless steel speculums with boiling water or by running them through the dishwasher.

As with all types of BDSM play, both parties should discuss their desires and limits before engaging in speculum play. Implement a safe word so the submissive can stop the scene at any time. In addition, dominants should closely monitor their submissives for signs of real discomfort or pain. Some discomfort is normal, but it shouldn’t be excessive. Speculums and lubricants also shouldn’t be shared among partners, unless the speculum is thoroughly sterilized.

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